Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts - (AB, Artium Baccalaureae) Wesleyan offers the bachelor of arts degree through a rigorous four-year curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences that is faithful to the origins of the college and that encompasses the best of current thinking about education. The curriculum ensures depth of knowledge through the required major and the optional minor. It ensures breadth of learning through an exciting, learner-centered general education program that grows directly out of the mission of the college.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts

I. The student must satisfy proficiency in modern foreign language and writing.

Students entering Wesleyan College must complete online New Student Assessments before registration. Language and writing proficiency is essential to successful completion of the general education program.

  1. Modern Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement

Wesleyan values the insights into other cultures that people learn through the study of modern foreign languages and thus requires a minimum of two semesters of one language or its equivalent. The College offers beginning courses in Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Japanese, and Spanish for students who do not already meet the requirement upon matriculation.

Means of meeting the Modern Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement:

  1. Students entering Wesleyan may show proficiency in Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Japanese, or Spanish through taking the College's new student assessments and placing above the second-semester level of the language (101 and 102). Students who place out of the first-semester (101) level will complete the requirement by taking the second-semester (102) course. In Spanish, some students may place out of part of the 101 course and complete the requirement by taking the 4-credit hour Spanish 150 course. (See the Foreign Language Placement Policy below.)
  2. Students may complete courses through the second-semester level (both 101 and 102 in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, or Spanish). A student must earn a grade of C or better in these courses in order to continue into the next course and to earn proficiency credit. If a student repeats a course in which she has earned a D or F, she will receive credit for the hours only one time. Courses taken to meet the proficiency requirement may not be taken on the Credit/No Credit grading option.
  3. International students whose home country does not have English as an official language according to The World Factbook of the Central Intelligence Agency, and who were required to take the TOEFL as part of the college admission process, will be exempted from the foreign language proficiency requirement, but may take language courses as part of their regular course of study. Exempted students will not receive any credit hours for the exemption.
  1. Writing
  1. Students must demonstrate the ability to write effectively through completion of a timed essay via the online new student assessment process which assesses their command of skills essential to college-level writing. A student will not be allowed to write the proficiency essay a second time except under extraordinary circumstances, to be determined by the English department.
  2. Students who fail to demonstrate proficiency on the timed essay will enroll in WRI 101. A non-native speaker of English may enroll in WRI 100 in lieu of WRI 101. Students who place in WRI 100 or 101 must enroll in the course during one of their first two semesters at Wesleyan and may not withdraw from the course. A student who does not pass the class with a grade of C or higher must repeat the class the next semester. A student who does not pass WRI 100 with a C or better may take WRI 100 or WRI 101 to meet proficiency. If a student repeats WRI 100 or 101 in which she has earned a D or F, she will receive credit for the hours only one time. Credit for writing courses taken at other institutions will not satisfy the writing proficiency requirement at Wesleyan College.

II. The student must complete the Wesleyan general education program .

The Wesleyan General Education Program. Based on the proposition that an impassioned learner is best prepared to live a fully realized life, Wesleyan College's General Education Program gives women the chance to gain knowledge and develop skills needed to live purposefully and successfully in a rapidly changing world. The Wesleyan College General Education Program broadens women's perspectives and encourages innovation. A successful Wesleyan College graduate integrates knowledge from many sources, thinks deeply and creatively, and understands and responds to her individual, local, and global responsibilities. A Wesleyan College graduate sees the importance of and makes connections among liberal arts disciplines: humanities and fine arts, social sciences, natural sciences and mathematics. She lives as an engaged citizen, making sound ethical and personal decisions, communicating her views clearly and persuasively and working in communities to solve problems.

The General Education curriculum provides academic experiences for students to hone their intellectual, expressive, and creative skills individually and collaboratively. The curriculum enables students to learn about the world through a variety of disciplinary perspectives and ways of learning. Many of these experiences also challenge disciplinary boundaries, encouraging students to integrate strategies for understanding, analyzing, evaluating, and contributing to a body of knowledge. Seven learning objectives identify the content focus of general education classes, and three competencies indicate the skills students strengthen as they complete the general education curriculum and prepare to make their unique contributions to local and global communities.

The General Education Program at Wesleyan College requires 37-38 credit hours and a minimum of 12 courses, distributed as follows: 1 course in foundation building, 3 courses for developing competencies in essential skills, 4 courses in which she explores fundamental issues that meet different learning objectives, 2 upper-level courses in which she expands on her foundational knowledge, and 1 interdisciplinary synthesizing course.

In the process of completing the nine developing, exploring, and expanding courses, she shall take two courses (with different prefixes) from each of the following four areas of knowledge: fine arts, humanities, natural science and mathematics, and social and behavioral sciences/professional studies. Finally, each student must participate in professional preparation or reflection plus complete an integrative capstone class; these last two requirements are met within the student's major program. The requirements of the General Education Program are closely tied to the three competencies and seven learning objectives outlined below. The details of each of the various required courses are explained in sections A-G below.

General Education Diagram

Competencies. As she pursues her studies in general education, a Wesleyan student develops her competence in the following areas:

  1. Writing
  2. Speaking
  3. Quantitative Reasoning

Learning Objectives. Through her work in General Education, a Wesleyan student develops an understanding of:

  1. how current thought, actions, and behaviors are informed by historical events and phenomena;
  2. how the natural world functions;
  3. how individuals function and interact within and among communities;
  4. how individuals and groups think and express creatively through diverse art forms and media;
  5. how women's experiences are shaped by such factors as age, class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sexuality;
  6. how living in a diverse and interdependent world presents both challenges and opportunities;
  7. how a liberal arts education provides a foundation for future professional success.

A. Foundation Building: The Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience (1 course). Each student shall complete the Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience (WISe 101), which will lay the foundation for her future coursework at Wesleyan. Students who enter Wesleyan begin their academic program with this course designed to introduce academic life at Wesleyan by modeling our diverse and challenging academic community, asking students to examine intentionally the value of a Wesleyan education for them, and helping them acquire skills and strategies for success at Wesleyan.

WISe 101 Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience focuses on who women are and what tools women need to be successful in today's world. Because it is the first course that recent high school graduates take, WISe 101 includes several unique components: (a) WISe 101 Lab is a one-hour lab emphasizing the academic, social, and emotional transition to college, which is taught by student affairs professionals/faculty and graded as part of WISe 101; (b) the instructor of each fall section is ordinarily the academic advisor for the student.

Entering First Year students must complete WISe requirements. Because WISe 101 is fundamental for success at Wesleyan College, students may not withdraw from this course. The only exception is that students who have reached the point in WISe 101 when it is impossible for them to earn a grade above an F, students may petition their WISe instructor and the Director of the First Year Experience for permission to withdraw from the course. If both the instructor and the Director of FYE give permission, the student may withdraw from the course, meet with the Director of the FYE to plan her academic future, and then take an approved substitute course for WISe credit.

The seminar has five goals:

  1. To provide students with an understanding of the nature and value of a Wesleyan education.
  2. To provide students with the academic skills foundational to success in college, particularly writing and critical thinking.
  3. To provide students with the skills and strategies needed to make a successful transition to college.
  4. To have students experience learning as the active construction of knowledge by working together as part of a diverse academic community committed to the free and open exchange of ideas.
  5. To expose students to juxtaposed disciplinary methods including women's studies.

Day Students. Day students entering Wesleyan in the fall semester directly from high school will fulfill their Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience requirements by completing WISe 101 during the fall semester of their first year of college.

Day students entering directly from high school and admitted to the college in January will fulfill their Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience requirements by taking or receiving credit for ENG 101 (3).

Day students who have earned an associate's degree through joint/dual enrollment while in high school have the option of choosing the First-Year Students curriculum or the Transfer and Evening Program Students curriculum. The student is responsible for notifying the Registrar's Office of her decision before the end of the drop/take period of her first semester. Should the student fail to notify the Registrar before the published end of the drop/take period of her first semester, she will be classified as a transfer student.

If a student does not successfully complete WISe 101 Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience I (3), she will take ENG 101 English Composition: Essays (3) to replace WISe 101.

Transfer and Evening Program Students (either transfers or first-time college students). Students who have completed two semesters of full-time enrollment at another institution and Evening students (either first-time college students or transfers) will fulfill the Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience requirements by earning or receiving credit for ENG 101 (3 hr).

Students who do not meet writing proficiency must successfully complete WRI 101 before they can take ENG 101. Those students must enroll in WRI 101 in one of their first two semesters.

Students enrolled in the Wesleyan College/Guangzhou University dual-degree program will take WISe 201 to fulfill their Wesleyan Integrative Seminar Experience requirements.

B. Developing Competencies (3 courses). To develop and strengthen skills in writing, oral communication, and quantitative reasoning, each student is required to complete one 3-4 hour course in each of these three areas. The course may be in any field including the major field.

Writing Competency

The writing competency ensures that students learn to write clearly and correctly to convey their ideas to a variety of professional and academic audiences. It stresses the importance of proper source use, clear argumentation, and an understanding of basic rhetorical formats and professional style guides, such as MLA and APA. Because students will benefit from learning research writing skills early in their academic careers, the writing competency requirement must be completed within a student's first 30 hours at Wesleyan. Students will fulfill the Writing Competency requirement by earning or receiving credit for one of the following:

ARH 126 The Critical Eye (3) - Fine Arts
ARH 230 Masterpiece (3) - Fine Arts
ENG 111 Analyzing Literature (3) - Humanities
ENG 235 Narratives of Nature: American Literature and Environmental Studies (3) - Humanities
ENG 240 Writing for the Web (3) - Humanities
PHI 210 Introductory Reading in Philosophy (3) - Humanities
REL 225 Exploring the World's Religions (3) - Humanities
EDU 207 Dynamics of Children's Literature (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
HIS 210 The West and the Classical Age (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
 

Speaking Competency

The speaking competency is designed to develop in students the ability to think critically, reason soundly, and evaluate evidence correctly. In addition, students should learn to organize information coherently, articulate content clearly, deliver ideas effectively, listen to others appropriately, and engage in constructive discussion and debate in a variety of interpersonal, group, and public contexts. Students will fulfill the Speaking Competency requirement by earning or receiving credit for one of the following:

THE 108 African American Theatre (3) - Fine Arts
THE 110 Theatre Practice and Criticism (3) - Fine Arts
COM 202 Public Speaking (3) - Humanities
ENG 217 African American Literature (3) - Humanities
ENG 221 Readings in Race, Class, and Gender (3) - Humanitites
BIO 203 Research Methods in the Natural Sciences (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
HIS 215 Reacting to the Past (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
PSY 106 Introduction to Human Services (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
 

Quantitative Reasoning Competency

The quantitative reasoning competency is intended to help develop a student's understanding of some of the logical, numerical, and graphical aspects of problems and issues of interest. Such an understanding is needed in our technological society, and has a wide variety of applications in virtually all academic and vocational endeavors.

New students who do not have an SAT or ACT Math score must take a mathematics assessment to determine which of the mathematics courses is most appropriate. A student with an SAT mathematics score of 600 or higher or an ACT mathematics score of 28 or higher may register for any of the Quantitative Reasoning courses listed below except for MAT 206. Placement into MAT 206 (Calculus II) or more advanced mathematics courses will be done through academic advising in consultation with a member of the mathematics faculty. Students will fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Competency requirement by earning or receiving credit for one of the following:

MUS 181 Foundations of Music (3) - Fine Arts
MAT 140 Precalculus Mathematics (3) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
MAT 150 Modeling with Algebra (3) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
MAT 192 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (3) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
MAT 205 Calculus I (3) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
MAT 206 Calculus II (3) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
MAT/PSY 220 Statistical Methods (3) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

C. Exploring Foundational Knowledge (4 courses). All Wesleyan students will be exposed to foundational knowledge from different disciplines. The Exploring courses meet the following learning objectives and students will fulfill the Exploring requirement by earning or receiving credit for one of the following in all objectives:

1. how current thought, actions, and behaviors are informed by historical events and phenomena;

ARH 235 Outside the Mainstream (3) - Fine Arts
MUS 150 From Bach to Rock (3) - Fine Arts
FRN 211 Intermediate French I (3) - Humanities
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3) - Humanities
SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I (3) - Humanities
WST 200 Women, Culture, & Society (3) - Humanities
ECO 206 History of Economic Thought (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
HIS 130 The American Experience to 1877 (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
HIS 135 The American Experience from 1877 (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
 

2. how the natural world functions;

BIO 103 Human Biology (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
BIO 110 Principles of Biology I (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
CHM 101 General Chemistry I (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
ESC 150 Principles of Environmental Science (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
PHY 106 Astronomy (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
PHY 121 General Physics I (4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
 

3. how individuals function and interact within and among communities;

COM 103 Communication Theory (3) - Humanities
PHI 216 Faith and Doubt (3) - Humanities
PHI 223 Ethics (3) - Humanities
REL 100 Theories and Methods in Religious Studies (3) - Humanities
REL 120 Christianity (3) - Humanities
REL 290 Readings in Religious Studies (3) - Humanities
BUS 105 Contemporary Business (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
BUS 106 Business and Society (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
EDS 114 Understanding Learning (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
POL 115 American Politics (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
POL 240 Introduction to Political Thought (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
PSY 101 General Psychology (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
 

4. how individuals and groups think and express creatively through diverse art forms and media.

Students may take either one 3-hr course in ART or THE, or three 1-hr MUP courses.

ART 101 Drawing (3) - Fine Arts
ART 106 Understanding Images (3) - Fine Arts
ART 108 3-D Design (3) - Fine Arts
ART 110 Creativity: Art/Design from Nature (3) - Fine Arts
ART 225 Graphic Design (3) - Fine Arts
ART 231 Ceramics (3) - Fine Arts
ART 241 Sculpture (3) - Fine Arts
ART 250 Traditional and Digital Printmaking (3) - Fine Arts
ART 275 Digital Photography (3) - Fine Arts
ENG 161 Creative Writing (3) - Humanities
MUP 101 Concert Choir (1) - Fine Arts
MUP 104 Percussion Ensemble (1) - Fine Arts
MUP 105/106 Voice Class (1) - Fine Arts
MUP 107/108 Piano Class (1) - Fine Arts
THE 102 Performance and U.S. Culture (3) - Fine Arts
THE 125 Acting I (3) - Fine Arts
 

D. Expanding Foundational Knowledge (2 courses). After the student has built a foundation of knowledge from various disciplines by taking four Exploring courses, she then develops depth of knowledge outside of her major discipline by completing two Expanding courses. The Expanding courses also act as a bridge to help prepare students for the senior integrative experience. The Expanding courses meet the following learning objectives and students will fulfill the Expanding requirement by earning or receiving credit for one of the following in all objectives:

5. how women's experiences are shaped by such factors as age, class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, and sexuality;

ARH/WST 354 Women's Issues in Contemporary Art (3) - Fine Arts
MUS/WST 215 Women, Music and Culture (3) - Fine Arts
THE/WST 328 Women, Culture, and Theatre (3) - Fine Arts
ENG/WST 253 Women Writers (3) - Humanities
WST 250 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Women (3) - Humanities
ECO/WST 210 Women and Economic Development (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
HIS/WST 267 Women in World History (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
HIS/WST 377 Seminar in Women's History (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
POL/WST 225 Women and Politics (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
 

6. how living in a diverse and interdependent world presents both challenges and opportunities;

ARH 216 Art of the Spirit (3) - Fine Arts
TRA 240 Travel Study (3) - Fine Arts
AST 250 Introduction to Chinese Culture (3) - Humanities
COM 216 Intercultural Communication (3) - Humanities
ENG/AST 205 Perspectives on World Literature (3) - Humanities
SPA 220/320 Medical Spanish (3) - Humanities
TRA 242 Travel Study (3) - Humanities
TRA 244 Travel Study (3, 4) - Natural Sciences and Mathematics
HIS 120 Early Civilizations (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
HIS 125 The Emergence of the Modern World (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
POL 222 Comparative Politics (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
POL 230 International Relations (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
TRA 246 Travel Study (3) - Social & Behavioral Sciences/Professional Studies
 

E. Synthesizing Courses (1 course). Each student shall complete one interdisciplinary Synthesizing course (3 semester hours), which must be outside of the student's major. While critical thinking skills are emphasized throughout the Wesleyan General Education program, the synthesizing courses are upper-level courses that give special attention to critical thinking skills. Critical thinking courses allow students to establish expertise in the various techniques of acquiring, organizing, analyzing, interpreting, applying, evaluating, manipulating, and presenting information from a variety of sources. These sources may include texts of information that may be written, visual, or oral. The student will apply these techniques in courses that are writing and discussion intensive. Students will fulfill the Synthesizing requirement by earning or receiving credit for one of the following:

ARH 325 Greek and Roman Art
ARH 327 Renaissance Art
EDS 301 The Playful Learner: Examining Play in Cultures, Society, History, and Marketing
EDS 313 Children, Nature and Society
ENG 300 Literature and Film
ENG 302 Digital Culture
HIS 323 20th Century Genocide
HIS 348 Terror and Terrorism in the Modern World
HIS 352 American Wars in the Twentieth Century
PHI/REL 309 From Modern to Postmodern
PHI/WST 355 Seminar in Gender and Philosophy
POL 335 Politics of the Developing World
POL 351 Nuclear Weapons
PSY/WST 301 Psychology of Women
REL 310 Religion and Society
WIS 301 Wesleyan Liberal Arts Seminar
 

F. Professional Development. To experience how a liberal arts education provides a foundation for future professional success, to establish academic, personal, and professional goals, and develop and demonstrate tools and strategies for personal and professional growth (learning objective #7), each student will undertake a 1-credit hour (minimum) Professional Development Experience (PDE) after she has completed 60 hours. A PDE can come in the form of an internship, professional research experience, community service project, creative work culminating in an exhibition or performance, or a self-designed project. Each student will also create an ePortfolio to document and reflect upon her learning experiences as they relate to career and professional goals. The ePortfolio will include several required learning modules (personal statement, transferable skills narrative, resume, and PDE reflection) in addition to any other items the student may want to incorporate. Students will share the completed ePortfolio with her faculty advisor prior to graduation.

G. The Integrative Experience (1 course). Each student will also complete a General Education Integrative Experience in which she enhances her capacity for integrative thinking through an interdisciplinary capstone experience that encourages her to make connections between her major and her general education. This experience will help her reflect on the methods, approaches, and/or content of her major discipline and give her an opportunity to connect her discipline with both her general education and with the world outside the classroom. The integrative experience is met in the major program.

III. The student must complete the number of hours and the designated courses required for the major selected including an interdisciplinary integrative experience.

The Academic Major. The major is a set of courses and experiences that provides the student with an in-depth study of a discipline or an approved combination of disciplines. It familiarizes students with the methodology of and the current discourse in the field of study. The major consists of introductory courses that provide a broad foundation in the field of study, intermediate courses that provide depth of knowledge, and a capstone experience that integrates the course work of the major. Study in the major enhances the student's ability to analyze information and synthesize increasingly complex ideas.

In the major each student enhances her capacity for integrative thinking through an interdisciplinary experience that encourages her to make connections among the various parts of her course of study and between her academic learning and the world outside the classroom. A student may declare her major in the first semester of her first year; the decision should be made by the end of the sophomore year. A senior must complete all requirements in her major program that are in effect at the time her declaration of major form is submitted to the Registrar's Office.

All major programs consist of at least 27 semester hours. Not more than 48 semester hours in any one discipline may be applied to graduation. A student must maintain an average of at least "C" (minimum 2.00) in the major discipline and must take at least one course in the major during the senior year. Additionally, grades earned in transferred courses that are part of the major are not calculated in the minimum 2.00 grade point average that is required in the major for graduation.

The following majors are offered:

Accounting
Advertising and Marketing Communication
Applied Mathematical Science
Art History
Art (Bachelor of Fine Arts - BFA)
Art, Studio
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Communication
Early Childhood Education
Economics
English
Environmental Studies
French
History
International Business
International Relations
Mathematics
Music: Music Track (non-performance based)
Music: Organ Track
Music: Piano Track
Music: Voice Track
Neuroscience
Nursing (Bachelor of Science in Nursing - BSN)
Political Science
Political Science: Pre-Law Track
Psychology
Religious Studies
Self-Designed Interdisciplinary Major
Spanish
Sport Management
Theatre
Women's Studies
 

IV. The final 30 semester hours of course work must be taken at Wesleyan (unless prior approval is granted by the Registrar).

V. The student must complete 120 semester hours (or the equivalent) with a cumulative grade point average of C (2.00) or higher and a grade point average of 2.00 in the major and 2.00 in the minor if the student elects a minor. Note: For graduation, students who major in Art (BFA), Early Childhood Education (AB), and Nursing (BSN) must maintain a grade point average of 2.50 in the major and must earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.50.

The Academic Minor. A student may select a minor program of study from the departments offering this option. A minor is not required but is offered for those students who wish to study a second discipline in depth. The student must maintain a "C" average (minimum 2.00) in the minor and must complete all requirements in her minor program that are in effect at the time her declaration of minor form is submitted to the Registrar's Office. At least one course or not fewer than three semester hours of the minor must be completed at Wesleyan.

The following minors are offered:

Accounting
Art, Studio
Art History
Asian Studies
Biology
Business
Chemistry
Communication
Economics
Educational Studies
English with a Literature Emphasis
English with a Writing Emphasis
Environmental Sciences
Equine-Assisted Therapy
Finance
Forensic Science
French
History
Mathematics
Music
Neuroscience
Organizational Behavior
Philosophy
Photography
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Reading
Religious Studies
Spanish
Sport Management
Theatre
Women's Studies
 

The following pre-professional programs are offered:

Pre-Allied Health
Pre-Dental
Pre-Engineering/Dual Degree Engineering
Pre-Law
Pre-Medicine
Pre-Pharmacy
Pre-Seminary
Pre-Veterinary

Academic Electives. The student may select, with the assistance of her academic advisor, elective courses from any department acceptable toward her degree. The student must take one course (three semester hours) outside her major field of study. The following limitations apply to elective courses, internships, and directed independent study:

  1. maximum of nine semester hours in applied music for non-music majors;
  2. maximum of eight semester hours in riding courses;
  3. maximum of twelve semester hours of field study (internship) toward fulfillment of degree requirements;
  4. maximum of six semester hours of directed independent study in any one field;
  5. maximum of six to eight semester hours (two courses) of special topics in any one field.
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